Not quite a snow day

SRJC+administrative+assistant+in+the+communication+studies+department+Jennifer+O%27Mahony+and+her+dog+Bochy%2C+named+after+Giants%27+manager+Bruce+Bochy%2C+enjoy+the+rare+snowfall+outside+her+Glen+Ellen+home+February+5%2C+2019.+

Jennifer O'Mahony

SRJC administrative assistant in the communication studies department Jennifer O'Mahony and her dog Bochy, named after Giants' manager Bruce Bochy, enjoy the rare snowfall outside her Glen Ellen home February 5, 2019.

Aria Quinn, Features Editor

Students of Santa Rosa Junior College were excited at the possibility of waking up to snow Tuesday morning, for the first time since early 2002, after checking the weather Monday night.

Only a select few actually saw this dream come true.

Weather tracking apps, like “The Weather Channel,” were predicting a 30 to 40 percent chance of snow in the early hours of Tuesday morning. While a full-blown snow day was nowhere near a reality for the North Bay, students and staff who live in the outskirts of Sonoma and Marin counties were treated to snowy hilltops and thick frosted yards.

Jennifer O’Mahony, an administrative assistant in SRJC’s communication studies department, lives in Glen Ellen and saw two to three inches on the ground outside her house early in the morning.

“That’s the most snow I’ve ever seen,” O’Mahony said. “It felt like I woke up in Tahoe”.

Sonoma County averages zero inches, per year, in snowfall. However, measurements came in between four and eight inches above 2,000 feet, according to the National Weather Service. Parts of the North Bay, such as Novato, saw snow at the top of the hills and mountains as lows as 1,500 feet.