SRJC libraries celebrate students with “Love Your Library” program

SRJC President Dr. Frank Chong gets cozy with his choice from the

Photo courtesy of Sami Lange

SRJC President Dr. Frank Chong gets cozy with his choice from the "Blind Date with a Book" program part of the "Love Your Library" February event at SRJC.

Faith Gates, News Editor

For the month of February, a student can go to the library and get a blind date – a blind date with a book, that is. The event is called “Love Your Library” and has four programs.

The first program is “Blind Date with a Book,” where a student can find a display table on the third and fourth floors of the Doyle Library in Santa Rosa or the first floor of the Mahoney Library in Petaluma with about 40 wrapped books and take one home. But don’t open it before you leave.

“They have funny descriptions like ‘spicy,’ ‘well-rounded’ or ‘delicious’ to give a hint of what is inside,” said librarian Sami Lange. There is a barcode on back so the student can take it to the front circulation desk to check out.

“Library Designer of the Year” is a program that asks students to make funny or serious videos or posters to promote the SRJC citation tool Noodlebib. Students can build bibliographies, create notecards, share projects with instructors and link their papers to Noodlebib through Google Docs. Over 6,000 SRJC students currently use it.

In the “Satirical Writing Contest,” students can submit stories about how the library changed the life of the student in about 150 words. It can be fictional.  Each of the two contests have three prizes of $100, $75 and $50.

For guidelines and to submit your entries for both contests, go to libguides.santarosa.edu/loveyourlibrary.

The “Art Talks” program takes place at 2 p.m. on the first Friday of the month in the Doyle location, and will take an hour tour of the art in the library.  The tours will last all of the Spring 2014 semester.

“The ‘Love Your Library’ month is really about celebrating our students, having fun and wanting to promote their unique voices and work,” Lange said. “The SRJC libraries want them to know we care about them being successful and we are available to help through class instruction, chat, text, phone or in-person.”